Muhammad Babangida is a committed philanthropist from Nigeria

Tag: Government

Recent Changes in Philanthropy Trends

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Americans gave more to charity than ever before. This was the third year in a row that they had raised more than they had in previous years.

 

Unfortunately, inflation is affecting Americans’ finances and their generosity. In addition, donations to charitable organizations are expected to become scarce due to the recession.

 

If the charitable tendencies of Americans are affected by the current economic situation, it could end a brief but essential surge. In 2021, the country’s donations to philanthropic organizations reached a record $485 billion

 

A survey conducted by the Harris Poll revealed that about 70% of Americans donated their time and money to various charitable organizations in the previous year. Some key trends that can be expected to affect the operations of these organizations include a possible increase in volunteering.

 

Generational Differences

The way a charity receives support may depend on the supporters’ age. For instance, younger Americans are more likely to donate their time and money to charitable organizations. On the other hand, older generations are more likely to cut checks.

 

The breakdown of the data shows that younger Americans are more likely to give their time and money to charitable organizations. For instance, almost half of those aged 44 and below volunteered in the previous year, as opposed to 31% of their elders. They also attend various events supporting the cause.

 

The survey findings suggest that the younger generations are more likely to carry out activism through their older years. In addition, they are also more likely to donate their time and money to in-kind donations. This suggests that their charitable tendencies may reflect more than just their means.

 

If the charitable dollars are not enough to support the operations of charitable organizations, they should start reaching out to the younger generations. This can be done by recruiting grant writers and business development professionals. In addition, they can also encourage individuals to become pro-bono fundraising consultants.

 

Demographic Differences

When it comes to volunteering, men are more likely than women to support organizations that deal with disaster relief, community development, and the military. Conversely, women are more likely to donate their time and money to religious and animal welfare groups.

 

Different reasons explain why people give. For instance, men are more likely to support a cause by making a financial contribution in the past year. On the other hand, women are more likely to support a specific organization due to their desire to give back.

 

The support given by older Americans to human services-focused organizations was much greater than that provided by the younger ones. For instance, over three-quarters of those over 45 gave to these organizations, as opposed to only 16% of those under 45.

 

Younger Americans were more likely to support educational organizations than their elders, who were more likely to donate due to their recent school experiences. Also, parents with children under 18 were more likely to contribute to these groups.

 

The uncertainty caused by the current economic situation can stimulate the creativity of charitable organizations. As a result, they have to shift their focus from their traditional message to appeal to more support.

 

What Is Responsive Philanthropy?

The question of how a foundation will set its agenda is often a central issue in its development. This article explores the different grantmaking styles and how they can be used to develop a schedule that is responsive to the needs of its donors. It also argues that whether a funded partner or funder sets the plan is not so much whether they are doing so but whether they can create a solid generative partnership.

 

Explaining Responsive Grantmaking

One of the most common styles of grantmaking is responsive grantmaking, which allows for the grantees’ involvement in shaping the agenda. This type of approach also allows for the acceptance of unsolicited proposals and flexible project designs. Usually, the foundation will only define a portion of the issue that needs to be addressed. Still, it can give significant latitude to address it most appropriately.

 

The main drivers of responsive grantmaking are modesty and prudence. This approach usually assumes that other people have more knowledge about the issue than the funder. Funders looking to work outside their region or zone of experience are more likely to adopt this approach.

 

In responsive grantmaking, the funder is encouraged to work beyond the pragmatism of who knows what to advocate for action in a specific area or at the grassroots. This philosophy goes beyond the usual approach of working towards a particular outcome. The relationship between the funded partner and the funder is also a central component of this approach.

 

One of the main disadvantages of responsive grantmaking is that it tends to focus on a project-by-project approach, which can limit the ability of the funder to generalize from its experience. Since the funder is not actively involved in setting the agenda and the execution of the project, it can be challenging for the funder to commit to achieving goals and improving the results of its grantmaking.

 

The public and regulators’ expectations regarding grantmakers’ ability to be accountable for their results can also conflict with this type of approach.

 

Overall, responsive philanthropy involves giving funds in response to a known need or to support a specific project. It puts money into the hands of the nonprofits best fit to meet those needs.

 

Characteristics of the Best Philanthropists

People who are philanthropists are individuals who want to make a positive difference in the lives of others through the donation of their assets and services. They come from various socioeconomic backgrounds, and there are many characteristics that they share.

  1. Desire to Improve Lives

People who are philanthropists show a deep concern for the well-being of others. They do not expect recognition or compensation for their efforts.

  1. Understand Others’ Struggles

Philanthropists are likely to be sensitive to the struggles of others. They are obligated to do what they can to make them better.

  1. Strong Social Awareness

Philanthropists are also open-minded individuals who are aware of their surroundings. They seek to understand the motivations of others in order to improve their lives.

  1. Future-Focused

People who want to make a positive difference in the world tend to look beyond the immediate issues and focus on the long-term goals of improving society. They realize that it is important to address the underlying issues in order to make lasting changes.

  1. Involved in Government

As philanthropists, they are also advocates for political change. They believe that it is important to advocate for social change in order to make it happen. This is because it allows for progress on a broader scale.

  1. Tackle Individual Issues

Instead of supporting organizations, successful philanthropists seek to support specific causes. They first identify the issue they would like to see change in, then look for organizations that can help make it happen. They then use their own resources and those of other groups to find the best solution.

  1. Utilize Business Principles

Philanthropists typically look at their contributions as an investment in society, and they use the money and resources efficiently. Similar to business leaders, successful philanthropists use their networks to promote a cause. They do not exclusively support nonprofit organizations, but they also support for-profit ventures and legislative initiatives.

 

How Community Engagement Can Restore Trust in the Government

Trust in government is an essential element in any democracy. Unfortunately for the United States, it’s currently running on a near-empty tank, as the gap between parties widens further with every passing day. While this is disheartening, the gap is not unbridgeable; simple human interaction can work wonders for combating this divisiveness.

When it comes to restoring trust in the government, why is community engagement important? Essentially, because it’s easier to trust in a system when one is actively engaged in fostering its growth and working alongside others who share a common purpose. This is what democracy is supposed to be about, but the political divide has made it difficult to move forward, with one side shouting for one thing while being drowned out by the other. Working together on a small scale will make even the largest problems seem less insurmountable.

The International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) has created a template known as the Spectrum of Public Participation—a useful tool in breaking down the techniques of community participation along with a spectrum of public control. In essence, there are four different types of community effort: On the lower end, we have Inform, defined as reaching out to people and educating them on the issues; and consult, which is gathering feedback from said individuals and using it to move forward. As these two require effort mainly on the part of the community organizers, they’re satisfying when it comes to feelings of accomplishment, but limited in terms of control over the outcome.

On the higher end of the spectrum, there’s Collaborate, which partners the volunteers with the public moving forward; and Empower, which places the decisions solely in the hands of the public. These two don’t see much action in the community organizing process, because certain decisions are left up to elected officials. Still, those officials wouldn’t have been elected in the first place if it weren’t for the people working on both ends of the spectrum.

This is an important thing to remember when becoming involved in politics on any scale. It’s easy to become frustrated with the government, to imagine that the ones in power aren’t working in the interests of the public. In truth, however, this is a democracy; the public is the government.

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén